Monday, April 7, 2014

Hunting: A country scene

The latest from the "Are you sure that's a good idea?" files of sewing is my new top, featuring two jaunty horseriders with dogs and country scenery, portrayed in a mosaic pattern. How could one resist such a crazy, funny print? Many might say "Easily", but not I, readers. This "refashion" is made from a scarf, the kind that junk shops have in the hundreds. I have always thought that scarves in the charity shops have the *best* prints on them, and have secretly harboured an ambition to turn them into clothing for some time now.
There are some good reasons to NOT sew with these scarves, not least of all that most of them are 100% polyester, so slippery and squeaky to sew and sweaty to wear. Still, the price of fashion is comfort and all that....I could not be dissuaded. I purchased an extra large scarf from the junk shop for $3, and made it up using New Look 6162.
Check out the print close up: 

Dogs, horses, men, trees, sky, and clouds. Irresistible, no? Or are you screaming "NO!" at your computer screen?

I made the pattern mostly according to the instructions, except I put bias binding, made from the offcuts of the scarf, around the neck and armholes. Here's a closeup of the binding, below. I don't know about you but neckhole facings always seem to pop out or sit funny. Perhaps I am sewing them wrong. Dish out advice, if you have some.
Actually I'm loving wearing this top, it cracks me up. It's not particularly sweaty to wear, and I love the brightness of the print on these autumnal days. It's as cheery as a hot cocoa, a toasted sandwich, and orange leaves blowing down from the trees. Happy autumn everyone.

9 comments:

  1. I love this! It is so so you. And when I look at the photo close up, I see the look of fierce determination on the faces of the riders, which is probably exactly how you looked when sewing the neckline.

    I have no useful advice whatsoever. I can barely darn a sock (actually even that's a lie - I can't darn socks, I just leave them lying around so long that Ros does them). But well done you! I bet you feel so pleased with yourself wearing it. You're so clever Dr Smith!

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    1. Thank you Nic! Yes I believe I did have a look of grit and determination while sewing bouncy bias strips that didn't want to stay in place, still, an artist must suffer in their work, ha ha.
      Hope your latest demo went well!

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  2. well, i love it. i've always thought those scarves would make good clothing, in fact, i've sewn a couple of garments from opshop scarves myself. but none so glorious as this one. what a pattern!!

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    1. Well thank you, and of course I had to go and look through your archives to see the items you'd made from scarves, and they are every bit as glorious as this. In fact, you even made a cool top from a scarf back in 2008 so I'm 6 years behind you in my refashioning!

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  3. I love it Miss Smith - it's really fun and unexpected. Yes you are right about facings flopping out and a lot of people use a herringbone catch stitch to discreetly secure them. A lot of people also use bias tape as you have done. Burda (my sewing reference point) uses both methods although they attach the binding to the front and flip the whole thing over to the back and stitch it down so the binding is invisible. However, I think you have chosen a great option here as the bias has a decorative effect and helps to anchor the pattern. So endeth the official sewing word on neckline treatments.

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    1. You see I knew you'd know just what to do. I wish I had asked you first. Still, I have few tops planned so I can try out the understitching and herringbone and whatnot and see what floats my dinghy, neckline-wise. BTW, your fitted blouse looked brilliant and you looked extremely gorgeous in the photo (nice haircut!). I would have voted for you on pattern review even if you weren't my sister.

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    2. Why thank you Miss Smith - did you notice the skirt by the way in my photo for the competition? That's what I did with the kilt I bought in from that op shop opposite the supermarket in Nelson (something or other goodwill). Refashions obviously run in the family.

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  4. I do remember facings being the death of a garment. Turning a great neckline into something the flying nun could achieve lift off with. However my only sewing lately has been mending, and here I have discovered that throwing unmendables on the fire really helps to get through it. HOpe you are enjoying Easter. Its a brilliant Dn pouring wet day, perfect for being inside by hte fire eating hot cross buns. Miri

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  5. I love it!!! Hi there, it's Christy. :)

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