Saturday, April 28, 2012

Tena koe

I know it's ingrained to love your own children's artwork but lately I've been so impressed, wildly impressed, by the cool pictures my kids are doing. This is one that Harry did at school and brought home the other day. I love this chap's expression and I thought it was ripper and beaut and New Zealandy that he's saying "Tena koe", which is "Hello" in the beautiful Maori language.
Since this picture was so friendly and cordial I got it made into some all-purpose cards at the local printers. This is a craft project that is very easy because I didn't have to do it myself. I like those. I like making stuff too, but I'm busy, you know how it is.
 
Awesome hey? I bet you know a small person who makes cool pictures too.
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Friday, April 20, 2012

Wheat bag. Old bag. Making amends.

Hello All, today I will waffle on about making wheat bags, since it's that time of the year. There are some very silly instructions on the internet from those who assert that you could put a zip in them. This is a terrible idea, because it would spark in the microwave, and it would also leak wheat grains from the top, even if you are a very good zip putter innerer. So please do not make a wheat bag with a zip, or you will be sorry.
Here is the way that worked best for me. Get two pieces of strong cotton fabric, a good size is about 35 x 25 cm. Not cotton with something spandexy in it because that will go funny in the microwave over time. Then sew your fabric pieces together, right sides facing, on three sides using little stitches. Big stitches will pull over time and you'll get wheat in the bed, which is even worse than sand or crumbs. Turn the bag right-side out, press it, and then run another little line of stitching around the wheat bag just inside the edge. That will make it nice and strong. Make sure you turn under a 1 cm hem on each side at the top edge for sewing up later.
Then add your wheat. I bought culinary wheat because all the poultry wheat had sold out from Bin Inn, but you just use what you fancy. Use about 500-700 g for a wheat bag the size mentioned above. Sew up the end, leaving no gaps. Run another line of stitching over the top, just for good measure. Then, if you like, spread the wheat evenly into two halves of your wheat bag, and run a line of stitching down the middle. This stops it from all falling to one end when you put it on your cold feet or whatever. You may have to pin either side of a central "channel" to keep the wheat from getting in the way of your sewing machine foot. When you come to use it, microwave for 1 or 2 minutes to heat it up. That's it.
On the topic of bags, this morning I caught myself being a total old bag. I lost the lid from my daughter's special pen, then refused to help find it because I was busy doing something else. I was rather unreasonable about the whole thing. This afternoon I popped into town and got her some new pens to replace the one I broke. It was only fair. She is a sucker for gifts, love hearts, and pink, so I totally smarmed up to her by presenting the new pens as a pink-love-heart-adorned gift. She forgave me. We're sweet again.
 
 Another day in the life, hey.
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